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Archivum Historiae Pontificiae 55 / 2021

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01 - Gabor Barabas - The Never Been Papal Legates, Who Left Hungary Without Having Accomplished Anything.

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Gabor Barabas

The Never Been Papal Legates, Who Left Hungary Without Having Accomplished Anything. Papal–Hungarian Relations at the End of the thirteenth
century

Summarium

The so-called Chronicle of the Deeds of the Hungarians, better known as the Illuminated Chronicle (or Vienna Illuminated Chronicle) after its most famous exemplar, known in the Hungarian Medieval studies as the fourteenth century Chronicle-composition is regarded in Hungarian historiography as one of the most valuable narrative sources of the early Medieval Hungarian history. This paper attempts to provide pew perspectives to the interpretation of one of its chapters and the information in it.
In Chapter 187 events are narrated from the end of the thirteenth century: the reign of the last king of the Árpáds, Andrew III (1290–1301) and the appearance of the young pretender, Caroberto from the Angevin dynasty of Naples, the later King Charles I of Hungary (1308–1342) are discussed. It can be read regarding their relation that: «In order to make Charles capable of ruling and of taking power against King Andrew, the aforesaid pope sent one legate after another to support his cause against King Andrew. But they could accomplish nothing and returned home». The aforesaid pope, Boniface VIII (1294–1303) in fact sent a legate to Hungary in order to act on his behalf in favour of Charles, but only after the death of Andrew III, thus not against him. The legate was Cardinal Niccolò Boccasini, the later Pope Benedict XI (1303–1304), therefore we can clearly speak of a mistake or a contradiction in case of this passage. This paper attempts to provide an answer to the question, whether the passage in question could be indeed a mere error, perhaps an arbitrary misstatement, as traditionally considered in the Hungarian historiography or there is a more plausible explanation to be found for the obvious contradiction of the text. The section can be interpreted in the author’s opinion in different ways as well. It is also possible that the aforesaid pope was not actually Boniface VIII, but rather his predecessor, Nicholas IV (1288–1292). Namely the latter indeed authorized a papal legate from his side, as a legate de latere, with the full office of legation, in order to act on his behalf regarding the Hungarian succession, as it can be read in the text of the Chronicle.

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Gabor Barabas

The Never Been Papal Legates, Who Left Hungary Without Having Accomplished Anything. Papal–Hungarian Relations at the End of the thirteenth
century

Summarium

The so-called Chronicle of the Deeds of the Hungarians, better known as the Illuminated Chronicle (or Vienna Illuminated Chronicle) after its most famous exemplar, known in the Hungarian Medieval studies as the fourteenth century Chronicle-composition is regarded in Hungarian historiography as one of the most valuable narrative sources of the early Medieval Hungarian history. This paper attempts to provide pew perspectives to the interpretation of one of its chapters and the information in it.
In Chapter 187 events are narrated from the end of the thirteenth century: the reign of the last king of the Árpáds, Andrew III (1290–1301) and the appearance of the young pretender, Caroberto from the Angevin dynasty of Naples, the later King Charles I of Hungary (1308–1342) are discussed. It can be read regarding their relation that: «In order to make Charles capable of ruling and of taking power against King Andrew, the aforesaid pope sent one legate after another to support his cause against King Andrew. But they could accomplish nothing and returned home». The aforesaid pope, Boniface VIII (1294–1303) in fact sent a legate to Hungary in order to act on his behalf in favour of Charles, but only after the death of Andrew III, thus not against him. The legate was Cardinal Niccolò Boccasini, the later Pope Benedict XI (1303–1304), therefore we can clearly speak of a mistake or a contradiction in case of this passage. This paper attempts to provide an answer to the question, whether the passage in question could be indeed a mere error, perhaps an arbitrary misstatement, as traditionally considered in the Hungarian historiography or there is a more plausible explanation to be found for the obvious contradiction of the text. The section can be interpreted in the author’s opinion in different ways as well. It is also possible that the aforesaid pope was not actually Boniface VIII, but rather his predecessor, Nicholas IV (1288–1292). Namely the latter indeed authorized a papal legate from his side, as a legate de latere, with the full office of legation, in order to act on his behalf regarding the Hungarian succession, as it can be read in the text of the Chronicle.

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